① Critical Reflection On Clinical Intervention

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Critical Reflection On Clinical Intervention



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What is a Critical Reflection? Introducing the “What, So What, Now What” Model

Describe specific strategies you used to promote and provide family centered care in the outpatient clinic setting. To promote and provide family centered care in the clinical setting, I introduced myself at the start of the clinical and made sure to not approach too. We have talked this semester about informed consent and how important it is that our patients understand the meaning of what they are having done.

We need to be able to understand what the nature of the procedure is and what it details. Informed consents can also bring up certain topics about the risk that can be involved with the procedure. As healthcare professionals it is part of our job to help look after the patient and make sure that all legal documents are in order. It keeps other people from knowing information they do not need to be aware of.

I believe healthcare workers should be formally introduced into the guidelines before entering the field so they know what can and cannot be shared. They should also be consulted if any changes are made to the guidelines. One significant event that occurred during clinical happened during week five and taught me the importance of learning what the implications are for a certain patient given their diagnosis. It taught me to ask what does a certain diagnosis mean for that particular patient and not just rely on general rules.

One of my patients for that day had a brain tumour and it was causing confusion among other things. While collecting patient prep, I had noted that, due to this brain tumour, the patient also was an aspiration risk. After being reminded of this, I ensured to follow these instructions for the remainder of the day. I felt terrible afterwards that I could have placed the patient in a position that …show more content… If I had of looked up and saw the sign before medication administration this whole situation could have been avoided. There are often important things that are all around us in nursing.

While it is important to focus on the patient, the surrounding environment can also provide critical clues for proper treatment of the patient. Despite the possible severe consequences of this situation, I think overall it taught me many valuable lessons that I have now incorporated to my nursing practice. I try to ask more questions about the implications of a diagnosis to a specific patient. I have also communicated more with other staff on the floor to learn more about patient specifics.

Show More. Read More. Nursing Student Reflection Journal Words 4 Pages Investing my time in the care of my patient gives the opportunity to not only assist them in a difficult situation, but also to learn more about their diagnosis and the treatment, while comparing it to what we have learned in class. Clinical Practice Reflective Analysis Words 2 Pages Throughout clinical practice this semester I have been able to address difference in nursing care, work alongside other heath care workers.

Critical Reflection On Clinical Intervention Words 1 Pages Description: The incidents occurred while carrying out certain intervention on my assigned client in the unit with my clinical instructor. NU Outcome 5 Words 6 Pages enforced my therapeutic communication within the healthcare setting. Outpatient Clinic Reflection Words 3 Pages Even though I did those things, I was nervous for this assessment, so I feel like I could have done more with using different techniques.

Henrietta Lack History Words 5 Pages We have talked this semester about informed consent and how important it is that our patients understand the meaning of what they are having done. Related Topics. Patient Pneumonia. Open Document. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence NICE, guideline for fall prevention has emphasised the need to assess the conditions of the home and make changes to facilitate easier mobility of the service user. As the environment is physically adjusted to the needs of the patient, this will prevent recurrent falls and will help improve mobilisation of the patient NICE, On analysis, the patient was living alone and had difficulty maintaining the cleanliness of his home prior to his fall.

This would suggest the need for assistance in the activities of his daily living. The NICE guideline also states that home hazard assessment should be performed to allow safety interventions and home modifications. Consistent with the experience of the service user of this incident, the home assessment was part of discharge planning. In addition, the NICE guideline emphasises that home modifications should be carried out within the agreed time frame between the patient and appropriate members of the healthcare team. However, it should be noted that home hazard assessment is not effective when follow-up and interventions are not introduced. The physical modification of the house alone is also not effective in preventing a recurrent fall.

House modification should be supported with appropriate interventions for the patient. The service user is only allowed to stay for six weeks at the rehabilitation unit. Since the house needs repair and deep cleaning, there would be not enough time for the service user to move to his house after his discharge. The service user also refused to have carers since he feels that he is capable of taking care of himself. He explicitly stated that he does not want additional support to assist him with activities for daily living ADL and made a verbal request to the rehabilitation team to help him return to his home.

For this particular case, the critical care incident involves respecting the wishes of the patient or acting on the best interest of the patient. As a qualified worker, I have to convince the patient that he could not immediately return to independent living since his house has to be repaired. In the meantime, we have to find a suitable place for him to stay before he can go home. Since the patient was adamant in returning home, I have to decide between acting on the best interest of the patient or respecting patient autonomy.

I consider this as an incident since social care workers should respect patient autonomy. On reflection, I began to question how I offered support to the patient after he expressed that he wants to go home after attending the six-weeks rehabilitation. It is understandable that patients who suffer from a fall do not want to be a burden to others. The NICE guideline notes that patients do not want to become an added burden to the staff when they want to ask help for mobilisation. On the other hand, I also have to inform the patient about his condition and why he needs to return to a home that is clean and modified for his needs. Hence, there is a need to introduce multidisciplinary management when caring for patients who have undergone hip fracture surgery.

For instance, the NICE guideline for hip fracture expresses that a patient should be involved in a hip fracture programme that addresses all his health needs. Specifically, the guideline states that multidisciplinary teams should aim for recovery of mobility, functions and independence. The same guideline also reiterates that multidisciplinary teams should enable return of service users or patients to their residence and ensure the long-term wellbeing of this group.

On analysis, our multidisciplinary team is following measures to ensure that the service user will return to a home that is safe and modified for his needs. This reflects values and ethics, one of the 9 PCF domains. The value of patient safety and ethics when caring for patients are demonstrated in our actions of helping the patient return to a safe environment following his discharge from the rehabilitation unit. I had to consider the best interest of my patient even if he insists on returning to his home immediately after his discharge from the rehabilitation unit. Barrett et al.

This is consistent with the ethical principle of non-maleficence and beneficence Runciman and Merry, The primary role of social care workers is to do no harm. Since the patient refused to receive additional support for ADL, I am aware that returning him to an unmodified home will increase the risk of recurrent fall. Although the patient was deemed as having the capacity to perform the activities of daily living, I felt that his current house is unsafe. On analysis, patient-centred care is important to improve patient satisfaction and increase adherence to a care plan. However, there are cases where social care workers have to intervene in the best interest of a patient Collins, a.

This case exemplifies this exception and shows the influence of social care workers in making meaningful decisions for the health and wellbeing of services users. I completed a social care assessment for an elderly female patient who suffered from a fall in her home. She was transferred to the rehabilitation care home following her admission from the hospital. Healthcare team members recommend the restarting of the previous care package and increasing the package. On the completion of my assessment, my recommendations were identical to that of the healthcare professionals in my team.

I recommend increasing the care package since the service user is experiencing poor health and has difficulty eating independently. The patient and her family members were very reluctant to accept the additions to the care package. Family members contacted my team and arranged a meeting with all health professionals involved in the care of the patient. The purpose of the meeting was to determine the type of support that the service user needs and to identify any additions in her care package. During the case conference, health and social care professionals explained why the patient needs modifications in her home and a carer to assist her in her ADL. For instance, it was explained to the family why the service user will need a stair lift and a pendant alarm.

Additionally, the health and social care team agreed with my recommendations to provide the patient with support in preparing meals, intake of medications and personal hygiene. Although the family was apprehensive about the additional cost, they finally agreed to the increase. The service user was very reluctant to return to her home after a consultation was made on why her care package will be increased from two calls to four calls per day. She was also informed to hire one carer to support her needs and to assist her with ADL. Considering the cost implications of an added carer and increasing the number of calls each day, the service user declined the addition in the care package.

The critical care incident in this case is the need to convince the patient that she needs the additions to her care package. This became a dilemma since this request entails that the patient and family members will have to make out-of-pocket expenditures. This could mean an added burden to the care of the patient. To convince my patient, I have to consider my knowledge on elderly care after hip surgery. This means I should give sufficient information about her condition and why she needs the additions to her care package. Since I am practicing patient-centred care, I gently reasoned out with the patient why she needs a carer once she returns home. The Department of Health reiterate that the patient should be involved in healthcare decision-making about their care and discharge.

Hence, I tried to convince the patient that she needs an addition to her care package to ensure that she is safe in her home and receives adequate nutritional support. I used my knowledge in elderly malnutrition in informing the patient why she needs an addition to her care. For example, I informed her that since she is an elderly, she is at risk of malnutrition compared to the general population. This condition could be corrected with appropriate diet, nutrition and support Harris and Hboubi, Further, malnutrition is a significant deterrent to optimal health and wellbeing Age UK, Patients recover slowly or not at all when they are suffering from malnutrition.

Hence, it is important to address malnutrition at this stage. Apart from malnutrition, there is also the issue of adherence to medications. There is evidence that adherence to medications might not be high amongst elderly patients Maclaughlin et al. It is suggested that cognitive functions of this group are in decline. Hence, there is a need to introduce medication prompts to remind patients when to take their medications.

Since the patient remains undecided after our consultation, I asked her to confide to her family and seek their advice. Engagement of family members in the treatment and care of patients has been shown to be effective in improving health outcomes Glasby et al. One of the reasons for this effect is that family members are more committed to improving health outcomes of patients.

This incident helped me understood the domains of rights, justice and economic well-being in the PCF. It is the right of all service users to receive equitable care Department of Health, Justice is not satisfied when service users do not receive equal access to healthcare services. However, the economic well-being of the patients should also be taken into account when recommending additions to care packages. It was evident from the case that the family has difficulty supporting the service user. The cost implication of an addition in care package could act as a deterrent to access in health services.

While support from social care services is available for different groups of service users, financial support is limited. Hence, this could be an important deterrent to care. For my professional development, I should always act on the best interest of the patient in ensuring that care is cost-effective and does not require patients and their family members to make out-of-pocket expenditures. On reflection, the incident was a learning experience since I need to be more acquainted on the economics of care.

I evaluated my actions after arriving at the decision to request for additions to the care package and discovered that I was acting on the best interest of the patient. I learned that as a social care worker, I should always be an advocate for the patient. In my future practice, I will follow the same actions I made for this case. I will improve my communication skills with my patients to help them feel that I empathise with them and only wants the best care for them.

The three incidents presented in this brief illustrate the importance of patient-centred care when providing support for service users. Lessons from these incidents could be used to improve my current practise. Specifically, there is a need to communicate effectively with team members to ensure optimal and quality care of the patients. In incident one, I learned the importance of exercising my leadership and professionalism when acting on behalf of the best interest of the patient. I also learned the importance of facilitating normalisation and independence amongst my service users. Maintaining their independence would help improve their self-worth. In incident two, the values of patient safety and independence were exemplified. A home hazard assessment will improve patient safety since homes will be modified to suit the needs of the patient.

In incident three, I learned to empathise with patients and to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of additions in care packages. This reflective brief shows that a holistic approach should be made when addressing the needs of services users. The NICE guidelines serve as an important resource for information on how to manage patients with different health conditions. Social care workers could collaborate with inter-agencies to ensure that quality care is provided for each service user. As part of my professional development plan, I will continue to seek for opportunities to work with other professionals and practice positive communication. I also learned that I should respect the wishes of the service users and facilitate their independence and promote return to normal activities.

On reflection, I Critical Reflection On Clinical Intervention to question how I offered support to the Critical Reflection On Clinical Intervention after he expressed that he wants to go home after attending the six-weeks rehabilitation. The first stage of the nursing process is assessment. Critical Reflection On Clinical Intervention Words 1 Pages Description: The Critical Reflection On Clinical Intervention occurred your future your ambition carrying out certain intervention on my assigned client Critical Reflection On Clinical Intervention the unit with my clinical instructor. I learned Critical Reflection On Clinical Intervention my theoretical knowledge foundation is Jesus: A Modern Epic Hero In The Bible as important as having clinical practice experience. Words: - Pages: Critical Reflection On Clinical Intervention. Tests showed blood vessels and bone fragments absorbed by osteoclasts.

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