⚡ How Does Sekhar Tell The Truth

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How Does Sekhar Tell The Truth



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How Accurate is Pendulum Dowsing: Do wishes influence dowsing answers?

Strawson ; G. Strawson , ; Watson For these reasons it is important not to conflate the question of the compatibility of free will and determinism with the question of whether moral responsibility is compatible with determinism. See Vihvelin for discussion. This entry will not follow that usage. But the focus, in this entry, will be on the question of whether free will or acting with free will is compatible with determinism. For instance, logical determinism is the thesis that the principle of bivalence holds for all propositions, including propositions about the future, and the problem of free will and logical determinism is the problem of deciding whether our belief that we have free will is compatible with the existence of truths about all our future actions.

For more on logical determinism, see the entry on fatalism ; Taylor , []; D. Theological determinism is the thesis that God exists and has infallible knowledge of all true propositions including propositions about our future actions; the problem of free will and theological determinism is the problem of understanding how, if at all, we can have free will if God who cannot be mistaken knows what we are going to do.

In this entry, we will be restricting our attention to arguments for the incompatibility of free will and nomological determinism, but it is important to understand one preliminary point. Nomological and logical determinism are very different kinds of claims. Logical determinism is a claim about truth ; nomological determinism is a claim about the natural laws. But nomological determinism says roughly that facts about the past together with facts about the laws determine all the facts about the future. So if nomological determinism is true, there are true propositions about all our future actions. Why does this matter? For the following reason. If there are truths about what I will do in the future, then I must do whatever I will do, and so I have no free will.

While this response has a powerful intuitive grip as can be seen from much of the popular and even scientific discussion of time travel , it is generally agreed, by philosophers, that the fatalist is making a mistake. The existence of a detailed set of truths about my future actions is consistent with my ability to do things other than the things I actually do. It is of course possible to agree that the existence of truths about all our future actions is compatible with free will while denying that the existence of nomologically determined truths about all our future actions is compatible with free will.

For comparisons between arguments for incompatibilism and arguments for fatalism, see van Inwagen , Mackie , Perry , and Vihvelin and At a second approximation, laws are deterministic if they entail exceptionless regularities e. The laws of nature are all-encompassing if deterministic or probabilistic laws apply to everything in the universe, without any exceptions.

If, on the other hand, some individuals or some parts of some individuals e. For a more precise articulation of determinism, the contemporary literature offers us two main choices. Following van Inwagen , we might understand determinism as the thesis that the world is governed by a set of natural laws which is such that any possible world that has the same laws as our world and that is exactly like our world at any time is exactly like our world at all other times. Alternatively, following D. Lewis , we might understand determinism as the thesis that our world is governed by a set of natural laws which is such that any two possible worlds with our laws which are exactly alike at any time are also exactly alike at every other time see also Earman There are two very different ways in which a world might be non-deterministic.

A world might be non-deterministic because at least some of its fundamental laws are probabilistic, or a world might be non-deterministic because it has no laws or because its laws are not all-encompassing. Determinism is a thesis about the statements or propositions that are the laws of our world; it says nothing about whether these statements or propositions are knowable by finite beings, let alone whether they could, even in principle, be used to predict all future events.

For more on the relation between determinism and predictability, see the Encyclopedia entry on Causal Determinism. Lewis ; Earman ; Loewer a; Beebee ; Schaffer to various kinds of necessitarian accounts S. Shoemaker ; Armstrong ; Carroll For critique, see Mackie a and Franklin Determinism understood according to either of the two definitions above is not a thesis about causation; it is not the thesis that causation is always a relation between events, and it is not the thesis that every event has a cause.

It is now generally accepted that it might be true that every event has a cause even though determinism is false and thus some events lack sufficient or deterministic causes. More controversially, it might be true that every event has a cause even if our world is neither deterministic nor probabilistic. If there can be causes without laws if a particular event, object, or person can be a cause, for instance, without instantiating a law , then it might be true, even at a lawless or partly lawless world, that every event has a cause Anscombe ; van Inwagen Whether it does depends on what the correct theory of causation is; in particular, it depends on what the correct theory says about the relation between causation and law.

What is clear, however, is that we should not make the assumption, almost universally made in the older literature, that the thesis that every event has a cause is equivalent to the thesis of determinism. This is an important point, because some of the older arguments in the literature against incompatibilism assume that the two claims are equivalent Hobart In the older literature, it was assumed that determinism is the working hypothesis of science, and that to reject determinism is to be against science. This no longer seems plausible. Some people think that quantum physics has shown determinism to be false. This remains controversial Albert ; Loewer b; P. Lewis , but it is now generally agreed that we can reject determinism without accepting the view that the behavior of human beings falls outside the scope of natural laws.

If naturalism is the thesis that human behavior can be explained in the same kind of way—in terms of events, natural processes, and laws of nature—as everything else in the universe, then we can reject determinism without rejecting naturalism. Note, finally, that determinism neither entails physicalism nor is entailed by it. There are possible worlds where determinism is true and physicalism false; e. And there are possible worlds perhaps our own where physicalism is true and determinism is false. So much for determinism. What about free will? How should we understand the disagreement between the compatibilist and the incompatibilist? Are we born with free will? If not, when do we acquire it, and in virtue of what abilities or powers do we have it?

What is the difference between acting intentionally and acting with free will? The free will thesis is a minimal claim about free will; it would be true if one person in the universe acted with free will acted freely, acted while possessing free will on one occasion. Since non-determinism is the negation of determinism, and since determinism is a contingent thesis, we can divide the set of possible worlds into two non-overlapping subsets: deterministic worlds and non-deterministic worlds. Given this apparatus, we could define incompatibilism and compatibilism in the following way: incompatibilism is the thesis that no deterministic world is a free will world. Equivalently, incompatibilism is the claim that necessarily, if determinism is true, then the free will thesis is false.

And we could define compatibilism as the denial of incompatibilism; that is, as the claim that some deterministic worlds are free will worlds. Equivalently, compatibilism is the claim that possibly, determinism and the free will thesis are both true. This way of defining compatibilism is unproblematic. There are compatibilists who are agnostic about the truth or falsity of determinism, so a compatibilist need not be a soft determinist someone who believes that it is in fact the case that determinism is true and we have free will. But all compatibilists believe that it is at least possible that determinism is true and we have free will. So all compatibilists are committed to the claim that there are deterministic worlds that are free will worlds.

But this definition of incompatibilism has a surprising consequence. Suppose, as some philosophers have argued, that we lack free will because free will is conceptually or metaphysically impossible, at least for nongodlike creatures like us Taylor , []; G. Strawson , If these philosophers are right, there are no free will worlds. And if there are no free will worlds, it follows that there are no deterministic free will worlds. So if free will is conceptually or metaphysically impossible, at least for creatures like us, it follows that incompatibilism as we have just defined it is true.

If it is conceptually or metaphysically impossible for us to have free will, then we lack free will regardless of whether determinism is true or false. And if that is so, then the incompatibilist cannot say the kind of things she has traditionally wanted to say: that the truth or falsity of determinism is relevant to the question of whether or not we have free will, that if determinism were true, then we would lack free will because determinism is true, and so on. If we want to avoid this counter-intuitive result, there is a remedy. Instead of understanding compatibilism and incompatibilism as propositions that are contradictories, we can understand them as propositions that are contraries.

Compatibilism and incompatibilism are both false if a third claim, impossibilism, is true. Impossibilism is the thesis that free will is conceptually or metaphysically impossible for non-godlike creatures like us. If we accept this three-fold classification, we can define our terms as follows: Impossibilism is the thesis that there are no free will worlds. Incompatibilism is the thesis that there are free will worlds but no deterministic world is a free will world. Compatibilism is the thesis that there are free will worlds and free will worlds include deterministic worlds. For some objections to this three-fold classification see McKenna and Mickelson a.

For defense, see Vihvelin and Theorists who defend impossibilism include Double , G. Strawson and , and Smilansky Another kind of impossibilist is the fatalist Taylor , []. In the older literature, there were just two kinds of incompatibilists—hard determinists and libertarians. A hard determinist is an incompatibilist who believes that determinism is in fact true or, perhaps, that it is close enough to being true so far as we are concerned, in the ways relevant to free will and because of this we lack free will Holbach ; Wegner A libertarian is an incompatibilist who believes that we in fact have free will and this entails that determinism is false, in the right kind of way van Inwagen But in the contemporary literature there are incompatibilists who avoid such risky metaphysical claims by arguing that free will is possible at worlds where some of our actions have indeterministic event causes Kane , , , , a; Ekstrom ; Balaguer or that free will is possible at worlds where some of our actions are uncaused Ginet Note that none of these three kinds of incompatibilists agent-causation theorists, indeterministic event-causation theorists, non-causal theorists need be libertarians.

They may reserve judgment about the truth or falsity of determinism and therefore reserve judgment about whether or not we in fact have free will. They might also be hard determinists because they believe that determinism is in fact true. But what they do believe—what makes them incompatibilists—is that it is possible for us to have free will and that our having free will depends on a contingent fact about the laws that govern the universe: that they are indeterministic in the right kind of way see the entry on incompatibilist theories of free will. Given these definitions and distinctions, we can now take the first step towards clarifying the disagreement between compatibilists and incompatibilists.

Both sides agree that it is conceptually and metaphysically possible for us to have free will; their disagreement is about whether any of the possible worlds where we have free will are deterministic worlds. Arguments for incompatibilism must, then, be arguments for the claim that necessarily, if determinism is true, we lack the free will we might otherwise have. It is easy to think that determinism implies that we have a destiny or fate that we cannot avoid, no matter what we choose or decide and no matter how hard we try. Man, when running over, frequently without his own knowledge, frequently in spite of himself, the route which nature has marked out for him, resembles a swimmer who is obliged to follow the current that carries him along; he believes himself a free agent because he sometimes consents, sometimes does not consent, to glide with the stream, which, notwithstanding, always hurries him forward.

Holbach []: ; see also Wegner It is widely agreed, by incompatibilists as well as compatibilists, that this is a mistake. But these threats to free will have nothing to do with determinism. Determinism is consistent with the fact that our deliberation, choices and efforts are part of the causal process whereby our bodies move and cause further effects in the world.

Putting aside this worry, we may classify arguments for incompatibilism as falling into one of two main varieties:. Someone who argues for incompatibilism in this way may concede that the truth of determinism is consistent with the causal efficacy of our deliberation, choices, and attempts to act. But, she insists, determinism implies that the only sense in which we are responsible for what we do is the sense in which a dog or young child is responsible.

Moral responsibility requires something more than this, she believes. Moral responsibility requires autonomy or self-determination: that our actions are caused and controlled by, and only by , our selves. To use a slogan popular in the literature: We act freely and are morally responsible only if we are the ultimate source of our actions. Each of us, when we act, is a prime mover unmoved. In doing what we do, we cause certain events to happen, and nothing—or no one—causes us to cause these events to happen. Chisholm Free will…is the power of agents to be the ultimate creators or originators and sustainers of their own ends or purposes…when we trace the causal or explanatory chains of action back to their sources in the purposes of free agents, these causal chains must come to an end or terminate in the willings choices, decisions, or efforts of the agents, which cause or bring about their purposes.

Kane 4. Arguments of the second kind focus on the notion of choice. To have a choice, it seems, is to have genuine options or alternatives—different ways in which we can act. The worry is that determinism entails that what we do is, always, the only thing we can do, and that because of this we never really have a choice about anything , as opposed to being under the perhaps inescapable illusion that we have a choice. Someone who argues for incompatibilism in this way may concede that the truth of determinism is consistent with our making choices, at least in the sense in which a dog or young child makes choices, and consistent also with our choices being causally effective.

But, she insists, this is not enough for free will; we have free will only if we have a genuine choice about what actions we perform, and we have a genuine choice only if there is more than one action we are able to perform. A person has free will if he is often in positions like these: he must now speak or be silent, and he can now speak and can now remain silent; he must attempt to rescue a drowning child or else go for help, and he is able to attempt to rescue the child and able to go for help; he must now resign his chairmanship or else lie to the members; and he has it within his power to resign and he has it within his power to lie.

Our choices include choices among purely mental actions to pay attention to a lecture or to spend the time deciding what to cook for dinner as well as choices about the actions we perform by moving our bodies. We might question whether arguments based on self-determination and arguments based on choice are independent ways of arguing for incompatibilism for the following reason: I cause and control my actions in the self-determining way required for moral responsibility only if my actions are the product of my free will and my actions are the product of my free will only if I have the ability to do choose to do, decide to do, intend to do, try to do otherwise.

If determinism has the consequence that I never have the ability to do otherwise, it also has the consequence that I never cause my actions in the self-determining way required for moral responsibility Kane At one time, this link between moral responsibility, self-determination, and the ability to do otherwise was common ground between compatibilists and incompatibilists. That is, everyone agreed that a person is morally responsible only if she has the right kind of control over what she does, and everyone assumed that a person has the right kind of control over something she does only if she is able to do or at least decide, choose, intend, or try otherwise.

Given this assumption, anyone hoping to defend the claim that moral responsibility is compatible with determinism had to first show that the ability to do otherwise is compatible with determinism. This debate was crippled by the fact that it took place at a time when counterfactuals were still poorly understood, before the advent of the Lewis-Stalnaker possible worlds semantics D. Lewis For argument that this pessimism was premature, see Vihvelin and Frankfurt wanted to defend the claim that moral responsibility is compatible with determinism without having to defend the claim that the ability to do otherwise is compatible with determinism. His strategy took the form of an ingenious thought experiment that was supposed to show that no matter how you understand ability to do otherwise—whether you are a compatibilist or an incompatibilist—you should agree that the possession of this ability is not a necessary condition of being morally responsible Frankfurt There were two steps to the thought experiment.

In the first step he invited you to imagine a person, Jones, who has free will, and who acts freely and who satisfies all the conditions you think necessary and sufficient for moral responsibility. You may imagine Jones in one of the scenarios van Inwagen describes, faced with a choice to speak or be silent, to try to rescue the child or go for help, to resign his chairmanship or to lie, and to imagine that Jones deliberates and decides, for his own reasons, in favor of one of his contemplated alternatives, and then successfully acts on his decision. In the second step you are invited to add to the story the existence of a powerful being, Black, who takes a great interest in what Jones does, including how he deliberates and decides.

You may fill in the details however you like, but you must imagine that Black has the power to interfere with Jones in a way that ensures that Jones does exactly what Black wants him to do. By lucky co-incidence, Jones did exactly what Black wanted him to do. He even deliberated and decided the way Black wanted him to deliberate and decide. So Black remained on the sidelines and only watched. Because Black never laid a finger on Jones, or interfered in any way, it seems that Jones is as morally responsible in the second step of the story as he is in the first step. How can Black, sitting on the sidelines, deprive Jones of the ability to deliberate, decide, or try otherwise?

But Black never exercises his power. There is a difference between the existence of a power and the exercise of a power. The truth about Jones is not that Black robs him of the ability to do otherwise; it is the more complicated truth that Black puts him at constant risk of losing the ability to do otherwise. His thought experiment was a failure; while most compatibilists were convinced, most incompatibilists were not. Compatibilists who were not convinced include Smith , ; Campbell ; Fara ; Vihvelin These incompatibilists insisted, though not for the reason given above, that Black does not succeed in robbing Jones of all his freedom; there is something that remains up to Jones Widerker ; Ginet ; Kane The critics of the argument rejected this charge, arguing that Jones retains a morally relevant ability to do otherwise, thus resurrecting the very debate that Frankfurt had hoped to undermine.

But there has been a cost. Our interest in free will is not limited to our interest in moral responsibility. The literature on the traditional problem of free will and determinism is dominated by incompatibilists. There is a growing consensus that the incompatibilist is right: if our universe is a deterministic one, we never have the ability to choose and do anything other than what we actually do. Before we ask whether this pessimism about the compatibility of free will with determinism is warranted, we should pause to ask whether there really is a substantive disagreement between compatibilists and incompatibilists. When an incompatibilist says that determinism would rob us of the free will we think we have, including genuine choices and the ability to do otherwise, and when the compatibilist denies this, are they asserting and denying the same proposition?

Or is the incompatibilist asserting one thing while the compatibilist is denying something else? Some of the things said in the literature suggest that there is no substantive debate. And one leading semantic proposal might seem to support the claim that there is no real dispute. Lewis , Kratzer For a different kind of contextualist proposal see Hawthorne ; for criticism, see Feldman So the proposition denied by the incompatibilist is not the proposition asserted by the compatibilist. The debate, he says, is about whether determinism has the consequence that no one is ever able to do otherwise equivalently, that no one ever has it in their power to do otherwise given what ordinary speakers mean, in the contexts in which they use these words.

The contexts to which he is referring are the contexts of deliberation and choice in which we consider our options, while believing that we are able to pursue each of them. The proposition asserted by the compatibilist is the proposition denied by the incompatibilist. Citing David Lewis as his example of a compatibilist opponent, van Inwagen says that he and Lewis cannot both be right. One of them is wrong, but neither is muddled or making a simple mistake van Inwagen In what follows, we will assume that the debate about free will including, but not necessarily limited to, genuine choice and the ability to do otherwise and determinism is a substantive debate, and not one that can be dissolved by appeal to different senses or contexts of utterance.

We will now turn to the arguments. These are arguments that appeal primarily to our intuitions. There are many variations on this way of arguing for incompatibilism, but the basic structure of the argument is usually something like this:. If determinism is true, we are like: billiard balls, windup toys, playthings of external forces, puppets, robots, victims of a nefarious neurosurgeon who controls us by directly manipulating the brain states that are the immediate causes of our actions.

Billiard balls windup toys, etc. Most of these intuition-based arguments are not very good. Billiard balls, toys, puppets, and simple robots lack minds, and having a mind is a necessary condition of having free will. For discussion of cases involving more subtle kinds of manipulation, see Section 3. The No Forking Paths argument van Inwagen ; Fischer ; Ekstrom begins by appealing to the idea that whenever we make a choice we are doing or think we are doing something like what a traveler does when faced with a choice between different roads.

The only roads the traveler is able to choose are roads which are a continuation of the road she is already on. By analogy, the only choices we are able to make are choices which are a continuation of the actual past and consistent with the laws of nature. But if determinism is true, then our journey through life is like traveling in one direction only on a road which has no branches. There are other roads, leading to other destinations; if we could get to one of these other roads, we could reach a different destination. So if determinism is true, our actual future is our only possible future ; we are never able to choose or do anything other than what we actually do. But several crucial assumptions have been smuggled into this picture: assumptions about time and causation and assumptions about possibility.

These assumptions are all controversial; on some theories of time and causation the four-dimensionalist theory of time, a theory of causation that permits time travel and backwards causation , they are all false D. Lewis ; Horwich ; Sider ; Hoefer The assumption about possibility is that possible worlds are concrete spatio-temporal things in the way that roads are and that worlds can overlap literally share a common part in the way that roads can overlap.

But most possible worlds theorists reject the first assumption and nearly everyone rejects the second assumption Adams ; D. If we strip away the metaphors, the main premise of the argument turns into the claim that we have genuine choices between alternative course of action only if our choosing and doing otherwise is compossible with the actual past and the actual laws. But this claim is none other than a statement of what the incompatibilist believes and the compatibilist denies. If the intuitions to which the No Forking Paths argument appeals nevertheless continue to engage us, it is because we think that our range of possible choices is constrained by two factors: the laws and the past. Even if backwards causation is logically possible, it is not within our power.

These beliefs—about the laws and the past—are the basis of the most influential contemporary argument for incompatibilism: the Consequence argument. More of this later. Producer designs or manipulates Victim in some of the stories, in the way the maker of a robot designs his robot or a god creates a human being; in other stories, by employing techniques of behavioral engineering or neural manipulation. We are supposed to accept premise 1 on the grounds of our intuitive response to the story about Victim. The argument for premise 2 is that if determinism is true, then we are like Victim with respect to the fact that we are merely the proximate causes of our actions.

The only difference between us in this imagined scenario in which determinism is true and Victim is that our psychological features are not the causal upshot of the work of a single Producer who had a specific plan for us. But this fact about the remote causes of our actions—that they are caused by a variety of natural causes rather than the intentional acts of a single agent—is not relevant to questions about our freedom and responsibility. Or so it is argued, by the advocates of Manipulation arguments. In his story, Black was a stand-in for determinism, and Frankfurt was trying to convince us that the facts about Black are consistent with the facts, as we know them, about how we actually deliberate, decide, and act, and these facts are the only facts that matter, so far as moral responsibility is concerned.

So even if Jones lacks the ability to do otherwise, he is still morally responsible. The Manipulation argument says, in effect:. Let me tell you a story to make this clear…. And then Producer is introduced, and we are told that he has a plan concerning the action or actions of another person, Victim, the power to enforce his plan, and moreover, unlike Black , he does enforce it. It would be a mistake, however, to think that manipulation of one person by another automatically undermines freedom. In real life, we know that we may be manipulated by others to do things we would not have done, but for their arguments or other ways of persuading us to change our minds.

We think that we could have resisted the argument or the sales pitch or the subtle pressures exerted by our manipulative friend or colleague and we might blame ourselves later for not doing so. The question, then, is whether there is a case that can serve the purposes of a manipulation argument: a case where Victim lacks the freedom that is a necessary condition of moral responsibility while not being different, in any relevant way, from a normal agent in normal circumstances at a deterministic world that is, from someone who we think acts freely and is morally responsible for what she does. There are cases and cases, and many of the ones in the literature are under-described.

The first three Plums of Pereboom are an example. Alternatively, the story might be fleshed out in a way that supports the judgment that Plum is not different, in any relevant way, from a normal agent deterministic or indeterministic in normal circumstances. But this leaves it open to the compatibilist to take the hard-line reply McKenna a, that since the normal deterministic agent is morally responsible, so is Plum. Opinions vary as to whether the intuitive cost of the hard-line reply is too great. Consider, next, cases of the Brave New World variety—cases where children are subjected to intensive behavioral engineering from birth, in a way intended to make them accept their assigned roles in a rigidly hierarchical society.

Everything depends on the details, but it is surely not implausible to think that the subjects of some Brave New World cases lack a morally significant freedom because their cognitive, evaluational, and volitional capacities have been stunted or impaired in certain ways:. Watson There are cases where Victim is under the direct control of Producer in a way that makes it true that Victim is not morally responsible for what she does because she no longer has the kind of causal control that is a necessary condition acting freely.

Defenders of Manipulation arguments claim, however, that the argument works even if these kinds of cases are set aside. They also say that the argument succeeds even when Producer is such a sophisticated designer of Victim that Victim has a past history that satisfies the requirements of those compatibilist accounts of free agency that include a historical condition. For a helpful account of the difference between historical and nonhistorical compatibilist accounts in the context of Manipulation arguments, see McKenna a.

To many people, it seems intuitively clear that Ernie acts unfreely and is for that reason not morally responsible for what he does. For consider this: Ernie has a next door neighbor, Bert, a normal guy in every way, much like Ernie ideally self-controlled, rational, etc. There is no relevant difference between Ernie and Bert. Therefore, Bert also acts unfreely and is also not morally responsible for what he does.

But Bert like Ernie is normal in every way, and we can also stipulate that he like Ernie satisfies all plausible compatibilist conditions historical as well as nonhistorical for being a free and morally responsible agent. If he acts unfreely, so does every deterministic agent on every occasion. Therefore the kind of freedom necessary for moral responsibility is incompatible with determinism. Mele claims that the case of Ernie is an improvement on earlier Manipulation cases in two ways.

Second, it is a case where it is clear that there is no relevant difference between Ernie and any case of apparently free and responsible action at a deterministic world. Mele is right about the first point. And, while some have contested this Waller , we should agree that he is right about the second point as well. But we should not agree that the argument succeeds. It should be noted that Mele does not claim that it does. There is a problem. If there really is no freedom-relevant difference between Bert and Ernie, why should we reason from the unfreedom of Ernie to the unfreedom of Bert rather than the other way around, from the freedom of Bert to the freedom of Ernie?

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